About

The Centre for Global Knowledge Studies (gloknos) was founded by Dr Inanna Hamati-Ataya in autumn 2017 with support from the European Research Council, and inaugurated at CRASSH, University of Cambridge, in autumn 2018.

gloknos (/‘glɒnɒs/) is a multi-disciplinary research centre and intellectual community concerned with the constitution, diffusion, exchange, and use of human knowledges throughout history. It aims to foster advanced cross-disciplinary research and pedagogical training in Global Epistemics, as well as cross-sectorial exchanges and initiatives, through a global network of associate members and partners engaged in academic and public-oriented collaborations and activities, an institutional and virtual infrastructure, and a range of scientific and public dissemination channels dedicated to the diffusion of its research outputs to the widest audience.

Visit the Centre’s website for more information.


gloknos is initially funded for 5 years by the European Research Council through a Consolidator Grant awarded to Dr Inanna Hamati-Ataya for her project ARTEFACT (2017-2022), under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (ERC grant agreement no. 724451).

Annual Lecture Series

Annual Lecture Series: 2021-22
Soil research and practice of ethnopedology – gloknos annual lecture series
18 Feb 2022 15:00-17:00, Online
Annual Lecture Series: 2020-21
Strauss in Beijing – gloknos annual lecture series
15 Apr 2021 5:00pm - 6:30pm, Online via Zoom
The history of science, the history of ideas, and intellectual history – gloknos annual lecture series
29 Apr 2021 5:00pm - 6:00pm, Online via Zoom
The view from the land, 1947-1981: ‘modernity’ in British agriculture – gloknos annual lecture series
13 May 2021 5:00pm - 6:30pm, Online via Zoom
Women’s international thought: toward a new canon? – gloknos annual lecture series
27 May 2021 5:00pm - 6:30pm, Online via Zoom
Indigenous data sovereignty – gloknos annual lecture series
2 Jun 2021 10:00pm - 11:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Ali al-Sharafi’s oeuvre as something other than simply local or global – gloknos annual lecture series
9 Jun 2021 5:00pm - 6:30pm, Online via Zoom
Islamicate territorial imaginations: maps, birds, and related machinations – gloknos annual lecture series
16 Jun 2021 5:00pm - 6:30pm, Online via Zoom
Kalwant Bhopal – gloknos annual lecture series
17 Jun 2021 5:00pm - 6:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Salvage, service, or militancy: missions, unions, and states in maritime Arab world – gloknos annual lecture series
23 Jun 2021 4:00pm - 5:30pm, Online via Zoom
Sarah de Rijcke – gloknos annual lecture series
9 Jul 2021 14:00 - 16:00, Online
Annual Lecture Series: 2019-20
Novelty and the emergence of the western global in the early sixteenth century – gloknos annual lecture series
28 Oct 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
The future of history: from cliodynamics to degenerative dystopia, via science fiction – gloknos annual lecture series
10 Dec 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
From Epistemicide to Global Knowledge: Reconstructing a Decolonised Academy – gloknos Annual Lecture
7 Feb 2020 5:30pm - 7:30pm, Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Heavens and earth: an empirical approach to knowledge across cultures – gloknos annual lecture series
15 Apr 2020 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Sarah de Rijcke – gloknos annual lecture series
15 May 2020 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Towards a global history of knowledge? premises, promises, concerns – gloknos annual lecture series
15 Jun 2020 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Annual Lecture Series: 2018-19
Turning the global history of ‘technology’ upside down – gloknos annual lecture series
19 Oct 2018 4:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1 & SG2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Geographies of knowledge in ancient and modern Iraq – gloknos annual lecture series
4 Dec 2018 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1 & SG2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
In the Bay of Bengal: modelling empire, globe and self – gloknos annual lecture series
23 Jan 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1 & SG2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Knowledge and war: paper technologies in early modern empires – gloknos annual lecture series
28 Feb 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1 & SG2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
The political economy of nutrition in the eighteenth century – gloknos annual lecture series
8 Mar 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1 & SG2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Circulating public knowledge: towards a new history of the postwar humanities – gloknos annual lecture series
2 May 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Heavens and earth: an empirical approach to knowledge across cultures – gloknos annual lecture series
14 Jun 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Room SG1 & SG2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT

Book Launches

Book Launches: 2021-22
Book launch – IR in a Post-Truth World | gloknos
6 Oct 2021 15:00 - 16:30, Online
Book Launch – Mapping, Connectivity and the Making of European Empires | gloknos
16 Nov 2021 2:00pm - 4:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Book launch – ‘The Right to Science: Then and Now’
3 Dec 2021 16:00 - 18:00, Online
Book launch – Scientific History | gloknos
16 Dec 2021 17:00 - 19:00, Online
Book launch: Endangered Maize | gloknos
13 May 2022 16:00 - 17:30, Online
Book Launches: 2020-21
Book Launch – Blood Relations: Transfusion and the Making of Human Genetics | gloknos
11 May 2021 5:00pm - 6:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Book Launch – Genetic Crossroads: The Middle East and the Science of Human Heredity | gloknos
22 Jun 2021 5:00pm - 6:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Book Launches: 2019-20
Knowledge Beyond Discipline | Global Epistemics Book Series Launch
29 Oct 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm, Rooms SG1 & SG2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Book Launch – Nikola Tesla and the Electrical Future
30 Oct 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Book Launches: 2018-19
Book Launch – Western Dominance in International Relations? – gloknos Sponsored Event
21 Jan 2019 6:00pm - 8:00pm, London School of Economics
Book Launch – Canguilhem
20 May 2019 3:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Book Launch – Making the World Global: US Universities & the Production of the Global Imaginary
11 Jun 2019 3:00pm - 6:00pm, Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Book Launch – The Transforming Power of Cultural Rights: A Promising Law and Humanities Approach
17 Jun 2019 3:00pm - 6:00pm, Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT

'Cum Panis' Seminars

Cum Panis Seminars: 2021-22
The costs of recognition: global epistemological politics of religion | gloknos
14 Dec 2021 10:00am - 12:00pm, Online
Cum Panis Seminars: 2019-20
Drake, Maroons and the Predation of Spanish Imperial Connectivity in the Sixteenth Century
29 Oct 2019 1:00pm - 3:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Consent, Prosent and Biomedical Data in the Era of Blockchain – gloknos seminar
30 Oct 2019 12:00pm - 2:00pm, Room S3, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Trade, Empire and Late-Victorian Economists
20 Nov 2019 2:00pm - 4:00pm, 1 Newnham Terrace, Darwin College, Silver Street, CB3 9EU
The Seventeenth-Century Safavid Diplomatic Envoy to Siam: A Politics of Knowledge Formation
12 Dec 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Neoliberalism’s Literary Rhythms: Engaging with Canonical Texts to Vanquish the Market Myth
24 Jan 2020 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Revisiting the North/South Binary: Towards a Thirding Lens
28 Jan 2020 2:00pm - 4:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Collection Ecologies: Insects, Information, and Improvement in Joseph Banks’s Knowledge Network
23 Jun 2020 4:00pm - 6:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Cum Panis Seminars: 2018-19
States of Emergence, States of Knowledge: On International Relations Theorising in Rising Powers
6 Nov 2018 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Intangible Material Culture: Technical Knowledge Transfer in Architecture
28 Jan 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Ranking the World: Globalising Status Competition in International Society
14 Feb 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
The Power of Agnosis and the Politics of the Unknown
14 May 2019 2:00pm - 4:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Becoming Worldly: Relationality as Methodology – gloknos
30 May 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Agriculture and Anti-Imperialism: The Transnational Career of Pandurang Khankhoje
4 Jun 2019 4:30pm - 6:30pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Consent, Prosent and Biomedical Data in the Era of Blockchain
10 Jun 2019 2:00pm - 4:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
The Burning Issue: Hazy Relations and the Construction of Knowledge in Land Management Fires
20 Jun 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT

Festival Events

Festival Events: 2021-22
A world of tastes: nature, culture and the making of the palate
8 Apr 2022 17:30 - 19:00, Online & In Person at Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Plant Sciences, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EA
Alternative proteins, alternative values: changing foods for a changing world
8 Apr 2022 15:30 - 17:00, Online & In Person at Large Lecture Theatre, Department of Plant Sciences, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EA
Festival Events: 2019-20
Meat and potatoes: changing diets for changing times?
15 Oct 2019 5:30pm - 6:45pm, Sainsbury Laboratory , Auditorium, 47 Bateman Street , CB2 1LR
Can you live without chocolate?
19 Mar 2020 6:30pm - 7:30pm, Fitzwilliam Museum, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1RB
Festival Events: 2018-19
GM crops in human history
15 Mar 2019 5:30pm - 6:30pm, Room SG1 & SG2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Objects: carriers of knowledge
19 Mar 2019 5:30pm - 6:45pm, Lecture Theatre 1, Mill Lane Lecture Rooms, 8 Mill Lane, Cambridge, CB2 1RX

Online Exhibitions

Publicity image for Imagining the Arctic Exhibition

The ‘Travels of the Artic’ online exhibition curated by Dr Anna Gielas (University of Cambridge), launched on gloknoswebsite on 1 August 2021.

This online exhibition presents historical illustrations of the Arctic excerpted from print artefacts (periodicals, books and postcards), highlighting the cultural and technological constructedness of the far North during the long nineteenth century (1789-1914). In other words, the exhibition focuses on Arctic images as representations of matter and as matter in itself. With this dual focus, the overall goal of the exhibition is to invite reflections on how today’s cultural as well as technological socialisation influences our mental images and understandings of the Arctic regions.

Enter the Exhibition

Reading Groups

Debt and Credit in Rural Communities Reading Group: 2020-21
Financialisation and Food
29 Apr 2021 6:00pm - 7:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Debt, Agrarian Change and Capitalism
13 May 2021 6:00pm - 7:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Debt and Rural Subjectivities
27 May 2021 6:00pm - 7:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Finance and Rural Labour
10 Jun 2021 6:00pm - 7:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Vernacular Experiences and Stories
24 Jun 2021 6:00pm - 7:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Domestication Practices across History Reading Group: 2019-20
Domestication and the Origins of Agriculture
4 Nov 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Classical Heredity in the Roman and Medieval Worlds
18 Nov 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Commanding Nature in Early Modern Europe
2 Dec 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Commanding Nature in Early Modern Europe (rescheduled)
20 Jan 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Empires of Acclimatisation
3 Feb 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
The Mendelian Gene Goes Global
17 Feb 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Politics of Hybridisation
2 Mar 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Alternate Twentieth-Century Biotechnologies
16 Mar 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Engaging Modern Genetic Practices
30 Mar 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Global Imaginaries through the Ages Reading Group: 2019-20
Prehistory: Agriculture and the Societal Imaginary
28 Oct 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Mobile Knowledges Before the Classics
11 Nov 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Global Classics?
25 Nov 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Global Classics? (rescheduled)
9 Dec 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Economic Globalisation in the Late First Millennium
27 Jan 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Imperial Imaginaries and the Making of Modernity
10 Feb 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Towards the Modern Subject
24 Feb 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
The Imaginaries We Were Born Into
9 Mar 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Hyper Globalism and the Retreat to the Local
23 Mar 2020 3:00pm - 5:00pm, CRASSH Meeting Room, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Knowledge and Digital Capitalism Reading Group: 2018-19
Knowledge in the Age of Digital Capitalism
16 Oct 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 220, Mary Allan Building, Homerton College, Cambridge, CB2 8PH
Cognitive Capitalism
30 Oct 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 220, Mary Allan Building, Homerton College, Cambridge, CB2 8PH
Platform Capitalism | Algorithmic Governance
13 Nov 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 220, Mary Allan Building, Homerton College, Cambridge, CB2 8PH
Downloading the Dreaming
27 Nov 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 220, Mary Allan Building, Homerton College, Cambridge, CB2 8PH
Ordering Knowledge
22 Jan 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 220, Mary Allan Building, Homerton College, Cambridge, CB2 8PH
Anticipatory Uncertainty
5 Feb 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 220, Mary Allan Building, Homerton College, Cambridge, CB2 8PH
Future Science
19 Feb 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 220, Mary Allan Building, Homerton College, Cambridge, CB2 8PH
Open Access
5 Mar 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 220, Mary Allan Building, Homerton College, Cambridge, CB2 8PH
Teaching Machines
30 Apr 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 2S3, Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 8PQ
Datafication
14 May 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 2S3, Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 8PQ
Digital Literacy
28 May 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 2S3, Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 8PQ
Digital Education
11 Jun 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room 2S3, Donald McIntyre Building, Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 8PQ
Ontopolitics of the Future Reading Group: 2018-19
Ontological Politics
11 Oct 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
The Politics of Life Itself
25 Oct 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Excavating Contemporary Capitalism
8 Nov 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Geontologies
22 Nov 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Ontopower
17 Jan 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Climate Leviathan
31 Jan 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Toxic Politics & Nuclear Bunkers
14 Feb 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Global Health Security | Cryopolitics
28 Feb 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S1, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Scopic Regimes | The Machine That Ate Bad People
14 Mar 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Non-Human Politics
25 Apr 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Ontofeminism
9 May 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
After Extinction
23 May 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
Living on a Damaged Planet
7 Jun 2019 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Room S2, Alison Richard Building, Cambridge, CB3 9DT

Summer Schools

The Science and Politics of Food in Human History‘:
Open Knowledge Summer School 2019

The Open Knowledge Summer School in the Arts, Sciences, and Humanities was a fully-funded,Widening Participation, multi-subject residential event hosted in August 2019 by gloknos at CRASSH, in Cambridge . The deadline for applications has now closed and we are not taking submissions of interest. 

 

 

Transdisciplinary Initiatives

The Transdisciplinary Initiative currently hosts four projects: you can find more information using the links below.

Wheat field in South Cambridgeshire.

Objects

Objects is a modular project developed in collaboration with the Cambridge Global Food Security Interdisciplinary Research Centre. It aims to foster innovative transdisciplinary research by furthering our understanding of the scientific, historical, and social dimensions of food and agriculture.

Starting in 2018-19 with funding from the Isaac Newton Trust, the European Research Council, and the TIGR2ESS project, Objects has assembled multiple small groups of researchers from the natural, physical, and social sciences and well as the humanities, to discuss specific objects (ecofacts or artefacts) relating to global food security. You can watch the full series online now.


Leonardo da Vinci's sketch for the construction of a wing

 

Leonardo

Leonardo is a project developed in collaboration with the Material Balance Research Group at the Politecnico di Milano. Through it we explore the structures and modalities of innovation and technical imaginaries of the past and future.

 


Global Epistemics

gloknos and publisher Rowman & Littlefield International (RLI) have launched a new, transdisciplinary book series on Global Epistemics.

Global Epistemics was founded and will be edited by gloknos’s Founding Director Inanna Hamati-Ataya, with RLI’s Isobel Cowper-Coles as its Commissioning Editor. The Global Epistemics book series is an important milestone for the ARTEFACT project, one of whose objectives is to develop interdisciplinary research on global knowledge studies. As gloknos‘s core academic dissemination arm, the series will foster, support, and promote empirically grounded and theoretically ambitious work that draws on advances across disciplines and speaks to audiences across and beyond disciplinary boundaries.

The series will be integrated into gloknos‘s research and dissemination structures, and will be managed by gloknos‘s core research team with the guidance of a substantial and multidisciplinary Editorial Review Board including world-leading experts in their academic fields and in the global organisation and circulation of knowledge.


The Right to Science

The Right to Science project is an ongoing interdisciplinary collaboration led by a group of researchers in the sciences, humanities, social sciences, and law to further our understanding of how to protect and implement the right to science as a universal cultural right.

We all have a human right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (the Right to Science [RtS]). The right has its origins in Article 27 of the United Nation’s 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted in the wake of World War II. In 1966, the UN turned these commitments into binding obligations under international law. The implication is that, just as governments are expected to respect the rights to, say, freedom of speech and due process, so they must also adopt measures to respect and ensure the RtS. The existence of this right is important for researchers and society. It adds a legal and moral dimension to a range of fundamental issues, including scientific freedom, funding, and policy, as well as access to data, materials, and knowledge. Yet, despite its potential for furthering science and human rights causes, the RtS has not received the attention it deserves.

Visitors

Matheus Duarte (August – December 2022)

Matheus Duarte is a post-doctoral research fellow (2020–2025) at the University of St Andrews, with the Wellcome-funded project The Global War against the Rat and the Epistemic Emergence of Zoonosis (grant number 217,988/Z/19/Z). In the project, he investigates the social and scientific history of rat-catching practices developed in Brazil, the USA, and in the French and British Empires during the first half of the twentieth century, and how these practices transformed the rat into a global actor on plague studies and intervention.

Matheus holds a PhD in the History of Science from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS- Paris). His main research interests lie in the intersection of History of Science, History of Medicine, and Global History. During his visiting fellowship at gloknos, Matheus Duarte will be exploring the emergence of rural plague in Latin America between the 1920s-50s, with a focus on Brazil and Argentina, discussing how this idea interacted with nation-building projects and public health modernisation as well as with global studies on rats and wild rodents.


Max Hancock (June – August 2022)

Max Hancock is a graduate student at the University of Chicago’s Committee on International Relations. His training is in IR, and current research focuses on topics in intellectual history, political economy, world systems, and the history of science. Currently Max is most interested in hybrids, human-animal relations, and nature-society dichotomies in the history of global capitalism. He is currently working on an article-length piece on biological computers and the making of world markets in the 1960s.

While in Cambridge, Max will be working on a paper revolving around several mid-century thinkers and actors and their work on biological computing. Max is working to situate his investigation at the point where the history of human knowledges, nonhuman intelligence, world systems, and economic thought collide.


Maria Birnbaum (Visiting 2021-2022, at gloknos, CRASSH and POLIS at the University of Cambridge)

Maria is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Bern. She received her PhD in International Relations from the European University Institute (EUI) and works in the fields of Global Politics, Religious Studies, and Colonial History. Her work studies the relationship between diversity and order with a particular focus on religion and global politics.

Maria Birnbaum is currently part of the project “Religious Conflicts and Coping Strategies” at the University of Bern where she is working on a series of articles exploring the conditions and limits of liberal diversity governance (“The costs of recognition“), and the entangled history and politics of Israel and Pakistan.

She is also finalising a book manuscript titled “Becoming Recognizable” analysing arguments for the recognition of religion in global politics. Here she shows how attempts to conceptualise, institutionalise, and manage social and religious difference in South Asia and the Middle East shaped the state-making processes of Pakistan and Israel and the conflicts following them. She argues that recognition along the lines of religion – in terms of border making, representation, or demography – came with considerable costs.

In her new project, ”Histories and Hierarchies of Ignorance“, Maria Birnbaum studies cases where political and legal unintelligibility are conceived as forms of power rather than forms of suppression.


Maarten Meijer (October – December 2021)

Maarten is a doctoral candidate at the Department of International Relations at the University of Groningen. His doctoral research focusses on the history of soil as an institution of geo-biopolitical governance, drawing on histories of infrastructure, technology, (soil) sciences, colonialism, and fascism. More broadly, he is interested in political and environmental thought, cosmologies of the end, and philosophies of translation and diplomacy.

In addition to his academic work, Maarten is a co-creator of an award-winning contribution to the design contest ‘Giving a Voice to the North Sea’, organised by the Dutch NGO ‘the Embassy of the North Sea’. He currently works together with Studio Inscape on a serious game in which players negotiate on the changing future of the Oosterschelde region for the Water Disaster Museum in the province of Zeeland.


Helle Porsdam (September – November 2021)

Helle is a Leverhulme Visiting Professor, at gloknos and CRASSH through Michaelmas term 2021-22. She is Professor of Law and Humanities at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of Law (CIS), Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen. She teaches American Culture and History in the SAXO Department, Faculty of the Humanities, University of Copenhagen, and Law and Humanities, the Culture and History of Human Rights and Cultural Rights at the Faculty of Law. She also holds a UNESCO Chair in Cultural Rights.

Helle did her PhD in American Studies at Yale University, has been a Liberal Arts Fellow twice at the Harvard Law School, as well as a fellow at Wolfson College, University of Cambridge, and the University of Munich.

During her stay at the Centre for Global Knowledge Studies, Helle will work on aspects of the Right to Science that concern knowledge production and the conditions under which such production takes place. These include scientific freedom and responsibility, and also science diplomacy.


Carolina Gerwin (2018)

Carolina is a Visiting Researcher at gloknos and CRASSH in 2018. She has completed a Bachelors Degree in International Studies at Leiden University in The Hague, Netherlands, including a semester spent abroad at University College London.

During her visit, Carolina worked closely with gloknos’s core team on her current research project. Specifically, Carolina is very interested in exploring how new media and communication technologies are transforming the way that knowledge is produced and circulated in contemporary societies, and is currently investigating the similarities and differences between online platforms and older technological innovations of knowledge-transmission, such as the printing press and the book.

Webcasts

Watch the ‘On the Creation of (Global) Western Spaces‘ webcast series via YouTube.


Watch the ‘Epistemologies of Land‘ webcast series via YouTube.

Epistemologies of Land Webcasts 2020-21
Sakshi Aravind – ‘Epistemologies of Land’ gloknos Webcast
26 Apr 2021 3:00pm - 4:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Eloisa Berman-Arévalo – ‘Epistemologies of Land’ gloknos Webcast
30 Apr 2021 3:00pm - 4:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Leo Steeds – ‘Epistemologies of Land’ gloknos Webcast
26 May 2021 3:00pm - 4:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Anna Wolkenhauer – ‘Epistemologies of Land’ gloknos Webcast
3 Jun 2021 3:00pm - 4:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Louisa Prause – ‘Epistemologies of Land’ gloknos Webcast
10 Jun 2021 3:00pm - 4:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Eduardo Machicado – ‘Epistemologies of Land’ gloknos Webcast
11 Jun 2021 3:00pm - 4:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Shailaja Fennell – ‘Epistemologies of Land’ gloknos Webcast
17 Jun 2021 11:00am - 1:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Laksmi Savitri – ‘Epistemologies of Land’ gloknos Webcast
24 Jun 2021 3:00pm - 4:30pm, Online, via Zoom
Grounding International Relations: The Land Question in World Politics – ‘Epistemologies of Land’ Closing Discussion
13 Jul 2021 4:00pm - 6:00pm, Online, via Zoom

Watch ‘Covid-19 as a Zoonotic Disease‘ via YouTube.

Webcasts 2020-21
COVID-19 as a Zoonotic Disease
23 Jul 2020 2:00pm - 4:00pm, Online

Workshops

Workshops and Symposia: 2021-22
‘Epistemologies of Soil’ Symposium
26 Nov 2021 2:00pm - 7:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Workshops and Symposia: 2020-21
‘The Right to Science’ Symposium
7 Oct 2020 - 8 Oct 2020 All day, Online
(In)visible Labour: Knowledge Production in Twentieth-Century Science
22 Feb 2021 4:00pm - 5:30pm, Online, via Zoom
‘Toward a Non-Hegemonic Sociology’ Symposium
28 Jun 2021 - 29 Jun 2021 All day, Online, via Zoom
Workshops and Symposia: 2019-20
‘Leonardo da Vinci: Imagining Futures’ Symposium
25 Oct 2019 9:00am - 5:00pm, Rooms SG1 & SG2, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
‘The Right to Science’ Symposium
1 Apr 2020 - 3 Apr 2020 All day, Room S1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT
‘Agrarian Relations: Towards an Epistemology of Land’ Symposium
18 May 2020 - 19 May 2020 All day,
Workshops and Symposia: 2018-19
‘Norming Knowledges’ Ideas Lab
29 Jan 2019 8:30am - 5:30pm, 1 Newnham Terrace, Darwin College, Cambridge, CB3 9EU

'Agrarian Orders and Transformations' Research Group

A depiction of the harvest in a scene decorating the tomb of Nakht, at Thebes.

The aim of the Agrarian Orders and Transformations research group is to foster cross-disciplinary discussions and collaborations on the present and future of agrarian life, with a special interest in patterns of continuity and rupture that characterise current and emerging trends in our food-production systems, the social organisation of agricultural life, and the normative orders that underscore and drive its regulation and transformation.

More information about future activities and opportunities will be made available soon.

Convenor: Inanna Hamati-Ataya

'Finding the Future' Research Group

Steampunk style robot woman, with a face partially detached showing Victorian-style cogs and mechanisms

More information about Finding the Future activities and opportunities will be made available soon.

Convenors:

Amanda Rees | Iwan Rhys Morus

'Global Epistemological Politics of Religion' Research Group

Two Black Birds' by Merry Zar via Pexels.

The Global Epistemological Politics of Religion research group explores concepts and debates informing contemporary social and political theory and practice concerning the dynamics and relations between religion, politics and order. Through the detailed study of various cases we explore the histories and political logics of various attempts to conceptualise and institutionalise social, religious and cultural difference, including the rule of law, the practices of knowledge and non-knowledge, and the recognition and protection of religious minorities. Questions to be discussed include: How does modern law and political practice regulate the spaces within which individuals and groups live out their cultural and religious lives? What are the histories and politics of modern constructs of religion in relation to the nation, technology and across different networks? The group is explicitly interdisciplinary drawing social and political theory, global politics, anthropology, history, and sociology of religion, and law.

Convenor:

Maria Birnbaum

Global epistemological politics of religion: session one
14 Mar 2022 14:00 - 15:30, Online
Global epistemological politics of religion: session two
25 Apr 2022 14:00 - 15:30, Online
Global epistemological politics of religion: session three
11 May 2022 14:00 - 15:30, Online
Postponed: Global epistemological politics of religion: session four
25 May 2022 14:00 - 15:30, Online

'Neurodivergent Socialities' Undergraduate Network

Image: Mosaic Tiles by UserID652234 via Pixabay.

The Neurodivergent Socialities research group is an interdisciplinary undergraduate student network.

The neurodiversity movement encompasses those with conditions such as autism, ADHD, dyslexia, OCD, etc., as well as (more recently and somewhat controversially) those with chronic mental health conditions such as bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, long-term depression, and others. It tends to be radically accepting of self-diagnoses and critical of conventional psychopathological frameworks. Mainstream Western discourse around neurodiversity frames neurodivergent experiences in highly medicalised terms of individual deficit. This precludes the exploration of neurodiversity as a normal aspect of human cognitive variation and as fundamentally embedded in social and political structures. Whilst remaining cognisant of the challenges of disability, this research group will contribute to de-pathologising neurodiversity by investigating questions around how neurodivergent states afford particular ways of relating to the world.

This research network will aim to start with relatively informal discussions and then move on to reading groups, workshops, blog posts, speaker events, and other initiatives as the group deems appropriate. An indicative (but not required or expected) reading list is available via our website.

Convenor:

Inika Murkumbi

'The Right to Science' Research Group

The United Nations' Right to Science, by Otávio Roth.

We all have a human right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (the Right to Science [RtS]). The right has its origins in Article 27 of the United Nation’s 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted in the wake of World War II. In 1966, the UN turned these commitments into binding obligations under international law. The implication is that, just as governments are expected to respect the rights to, say, freedom of speech and due process, so they must also adopt measures to respect and ensure the RtS. The existence of this right is important for researchers and society. It adds a legal and moral dimension to a range of fundamental issues, including scientific freedom, funding, and policy, as well as access to data, materials, and knowledge. Yet, despite its potential for furthering science and human rights causes, the RtS has not received the attention it deserves.

This research group will work towards:

1) a deeper understanding of the right to science, both legally and conceptually
2) activating the right to science in practice
3) making the right to science a better known human right.

Activities planned at this early stage include monthly zoom meetings and book launches for our Cambridge University edited volume, The Right to Science: Then and Now which will be published in late November or early December.

Convenors:

Helle Porsdam | Sebastian Porsdam Mann | Christine Mitchell

Book launch – ‘The Right to Science: Then and Now’
3 Dec 2021 16:00 - 18:00, Online
A right to science versus a communal right to religion
26 Apr 2022 15:00, Online

'Science and its Others' Research Group

Two Gourds of Curare Poison from the Amazon Basin, ca. 1860 (Kew Gardens CC BY)

The Science and its Others: Histories of Ethno-Science group studies the changing relationship between scientific knowledge and what is variously called local, ‘indigenous’ or ‘native’ knowledges. Our starting point is the eighteenth-century travel instructions that asked naturalists to routinely record indigenous names and knowledge. We explore economic botany, ethnography and other strands of nineteenth-century natural history relying on systematic surveys of national and colonial territories, and the eventual consolidation of ethno-disciplines in the twentieth century. We are interested in the putative shifts towards increasingly global awareness and calls for the incorporation of ‘traditional’ knowledge in political and scientific discourses. Fundamental questions we want to address include: under which historical and epistemological conditions did indigenous forms of knowledge undergo a revaluation by western scientists – from the colonial and derogative notion of ‘savage’ to what is now called ‘ethnoscience’? What forms of credit and intellectual property organised the intersection of indigenous and scientific knowledge? What consequences, if any, did these intersections have for the demarcation between science and non-science? And what impact, in turn, did the exposure to ‘science’ have on the self-understanding and identity of local knowledge communities?

Convenors:

Harriet Mercer | Staffan Müller-Wille | Raphael Uchôa

Nineteenth-century travel instructions
20 Oct 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Economic botany in the nineteenth century
24 Nov 2021 3:00pm - 4:00pm, Online, via Zoom
Translations between field and lab
19 Jan 2022 3:00pm - 4:00pm, online
‘Ethno-Science’ lecture: Esther Jean Langdon
23 Feb 2022 15:00 - 16:00, Online, via Zoom
Ethno-science and historiography
16 Mar 2022 15:00 - 16:00, Online, via Zoom
Recent reflections on bioprospecting
18 May 2022 15:00 - 16:00, Online, via Zoom
‘Ethno-science’ guest speakers: Graham Dutfield and Helen Tilley
14 Jun 2022 15:00 - 18:00, Hybrid: Zoom and The Bradfield Room, Darwin College, Silver Street, Cambridge, CB3 9EU

'Taste and Knowledge' Research Group

Image: ‘Smell, plate three from The Five Senses’, by Jacob van der Heyden. Credit: The Wallace L. DeWolf and Joseph Brooks Fair Collections, CC0 Public Domain Designation.

The Taste and Knowledge research group seeks to understand the strange fate of taste as a form of knowledge production intermingled with value judgments.

Taste is central to a wide range of practices used to assay objects and materials for quality and value, from the taste panels used by food producers to the judgments performed by experts in gemstones, wine, art, and coffee. Indeed, taste plays a central but often unrecognised role in the modern economy, determining the value and profitability of countless products.

At one and the same time, however, taste is widely regarded as an intrinsically unreliable way of knowing about the world, subject to the vagaries of both individual taste and individual bodies. Across a huge range of fields, from the sciences to the most obvious objects of taste judgment – food criticism and production – taste is regarded with suspicion. Widespread efforts are afoot to replace or supplement it with apparently more objective practices of quantification and measurement.

We want to understand how and why taste came to have this ambiguous status – at once central to our understanding of quality and value, but at the same time maligned as subjective and inaccurate.

Convenors:

Marieke Hendriksen | Alex Wragge-Morley

Senses of taste
24 Nov 2021 4:15pm - 5:30pm, Online
Taste and value
1 Dec 2021 4:00pm - 5:00pm, Online
Qualifying taste
23 Feb 2022 16:00-17:30, Online
POSTPONED Training taste
23 Mar 2022 16:00 - 17:30, Online
Training taste
6 Apr 2022 16:00 - 17:30, Online

The Team

gloknos Core Team

gloknos is home to a wide variety of associate members, institutional partners, research group leaders, and other affiliates – you can see their profiles via our website. We are also grateful for the careful guidance and support of our Advisory Board members.

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH IN THE ARTS, SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

Tel: +44 1223 766886
Email enquiries@crassh.cam.ac.uk