Writing and Winning the Large Project Grant

14 March 2016, 12:30 - 14:00

CRASSH Meeting Room

With Dr Christos Lynteris (CRASSH), PI of the ERC-funded 5-year project Visual Representations of the Third Plague Pandemic

Grant writing - especially the large research programme sort - is both art and strategy: the intellectual groundwork, the logistics, the budgets, the timing; the many people you might ask to review it, the many conversations you might have about where to host it and whom to approach; the process of interviews if the magic of short-listing happens.

Dr Christos Lynteris, holder of an ERC starter grant (2013-17) and the CRASSH post-doctoral forum are hosting an informal, frank discussion on the things to think about when preparing such a grant, particularly from the post-doc perspective.

Come for lunch, discussion and insight into the process of transition from post-doc to PI.

RSVP to Alison Wood, ajew3@cam.ac.uk
CRASSH Post-doctoral Forum
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Dr Christos Lynteris
Christos Lynteris's most recent work investigates visual representations of outbreaks in China between 1855 and 1959, with a particular focus on the Hong Kong bubonic plague outbreak of 1894 and the Manchurian pneumonic plague outbreak in 1910-11. In comparing the two, his research focuses on the entanglement of visualisation strategies and biopolitical and geopolitical aspects of the epidemics. Of particular interest is the depiction of Chinese migrant workers (so-called "coolies") as carriers of disease, and the representation of "coolie" urban environment and housing as an imagined source of infection.

On a global scale Dr Lynteris' research engages in a comparative analysis, focusing on regimes of visibility and invisibility of plague. The work focuses on the inter-constitution of epistemological and ethical questions and strategies pertaining to how the causes and effects of plague are made visual. Key to the study, is the exploration of the implications of this complex nexus of symbolic and performative practices on ways in which we today visualise epidemics such as Ebola and bird flu.

http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/people/profile/christos-lynteris