Published by Manchester University Press, July 2016.

Edited by Gareth Atkins, Fellow and Director of Studies in History, Queens’ College, Cambridge, and member of the Bible and Antiquity in Nineteenth-Century Culture project at CRASSH from 2012 – 2017.

 

This book examines the place of 'saints' and sanctity in a self-consciously modern age, and argues that Protestants were as fascinated by such figures as Catholics were. Long after the mechanisms of canonisation had disappeared, people continued not only to engage with the saints of the past but continued to make their own saints in all but name. Just as strikingly, it claims that devotional practices and language were not the property of orthodox Christians alone. Making and remaking saints explores for the first time how sainthood remained significant in this period both as an enduring institution and as a metaphor that could be transposed into unexpected contexts. Each of the chapters in this volume focuses on the reception of a particular individual or group, and together they will appeal to not only historians of religion, but those concerned with material culture, culture of history, and the reshaping of British identities in an age of faith and doubt.

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