27 Jan 2022 - 28 Jan 2022All dayOnline event

Description

The interdisciplinary conference ‘Those who leave and those who stay: the consequences of emigration for sending countries’ aims to bring together researchers from different fields – political science, education, anthropology, history, political economy, and sociology, among others – who explore the socio-political and economic consequences of emigration for sending countries, regions and communities. The field of international migration is predominantly focused on the topic of immigration, debating its causes, the legal challenges it poses, and the way it has been politicised in receiving countries, among other topics of scholarly and political importance. Yet, there has been much less focus on ‘those who stay’, that is on how emigration transforms the places and people who are left behind.

This conference aims to open a broader conversation on the consequences of global flows of labour and explore them from multiple, yet complementing disciplinary perspectives. We plan to organise also a panel with civil society activists and practitioners looking at this issue from a policy perspective.

Contributions from across the globe are welcome since we want to have a conversation that is inclusive of different geographic backgrounds. The conference will be held online in January 2022 and will be without any registration fee in order to make it possible for scholars from different parts of the world to participate, regardless of pandemic-related travel restrictions.

Convenor

Julia Rone (MCTD Cambridge)

Keynote speakers

  • Susan Robertson, Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Cambridge
  • Olga Onuch, Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of Manchester, Principle Investigator of the Mobilise Project

This event is part of CRASSH’s 20th anniversary programme on the theme of ‘Global Conversations’.

Call for papers

This interdisciplinary conference aims to bring together researchers from different fields – political science, education, anthropology, history, political economy, and sociology, among others – who explore the socio-political and economic consequences of emigration for sending countries, regions and communities.

Some of the questions that we would like to explore include, but are not limited to:

  • What are the consequences of emigration for political participation in sending countries? Has ‘exit’ hindered ‘voice’ at home? Has emigration diminished or rather transformed protest mobilization and electoral participation in sending countries?
  • Research on the migration-social reproduction nexus has been gaining more and more prominence in recent years. While many accounts are focused on female migrants’ role in host societies’ infrastructures and structures of care, less attention has been paid to the effects these circuits of migration have on sending countries, regions, and communities. We are interested in deepening these conversations with regards to the gendered consequences of emigration for structures and infrastructures of social reproduction at home. How do educational mobility, seasonal work and long-term emigration affect economies of care? What are the individual and collective challenges that the gendered character of emigration poses?
  • How does emigration counter or feed into existing inequalities between countries, but also between regions and cities? What has been the interplay between practices and discourses of emigration and immigration in our inequality-ridden geographies? Finally, what have been the economic consequences of emigration for sending countries?  How has emigration affected the Welfare State, taxation policies and skills distribution in sending countries?
  • The relationship between migration and kinship enjoys a long scholarly tradition and attention. How does the emigration of family members affect the personal and social biographies of those left behind? How do those who stay behind justify their choice: to emigrate or not to emigrate. To what extent is it useful to talk about emigration as a ‘personal choice’?

If you are interested in participating in the conference, send your 300-words abstract by 20 September 2021 to the following email address: consequencesofemigration@gmail.com.

Programme

27 January 2022

All times are in GMT
10:00-11:15

Introduction and keynote speech

Susan Robertson, Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Cambridge

11:30-13:15

Panel 1: “There is nothing good here”: communities and places left behind

Ilona Grabmaier (University of Vienna)
There’s nothing good here! Living alone in old age, narratives of loss, and transformations of belonging

Miriam Friz Trzeciak (Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg)
What does emigration mean for the community? Social worlds of leaving and staying in the borderland Chiapas

Viorela Ducu and Áron Telegdi-Csetri (Babeș-Bolyai University)
Children’s views on parents’ migration in Moldovan and Ukrainian transnational families

Mari-An C. Santos (Independent researcher)
Filipino kinship in those left behind by migrant mothers

13:15-14:30

Lunch break

14:30-16:15

Panel 2: Emigration’s social and economic impacts

Sascha Krannich (Gießen University) and Uwe Hunger (Fulda University of Applied Sciences)
International students: do they reduce or boost social inequality in sending countries?

Katarzyna Andrejuk (Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences)
Development of entrepreneurial cultures in the sending and receiving countries: the role of migrant entrepreneurs

Ana Isabel López García (Maastricht University) and Barry Maydom (Birkbeck College, University of London)
Migrant transnationalism and state capacity: experimental evidence from Mexico

 

16:30-17:45

Panel 3: Women on the move

Z. Selen Artan (İstanbul 29 Mayis University)
Unchained and untamed: women who left Turkey for Europe in the early emigration period (1960-1970s)

Janine Läpple & Judith Möllers (Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies)
Can I change my home country for the better? A case study on female return migration to Kosovo

28 January 2022

10:00-11:15

Introduction and keynote speech

Olga Onuch (Senior Lecturer in Politics at the University of Manchester, Principle Investigator of the Mobilise Project)

11:30-13:15

Panel 4 : Emigration and political participation

Vesco Paskalev (Brunel University London)
Is free movement of people subverting democracy in Europe? A Hirschmanian hypothesis

Maik Herold and Cyrill Otteni (TU Dresden)
Declining population – increasing populism? The impact of emigration on voting behaviour in Germany

Virginia Fanny Faccenda (University Saint-Louis Bruxelles) and Mariam Camilla Rechchad (University of Turin)
Elections in 2021: what fronts and forms of political participation for Syrian and Moroccan communities in Belgium?

Barry Maydom (Birkbeck College, University of London)
Remittances and political participation in the Middle East and North Africa

Jesse Acevedo (University of Denver)
Exit and exodus: the political effects of migrant caravans in Honduras

13:15-14:30

Lunch break

14:30-16:15

Panel 5: The political economy of emigration

Cecilia Bruzelius (University of Tübingen)
Emigration as labour market policy: consequences of free movement for social integration

Christof Roos and Martin Seeliger (Europa-Universität Flensburg/Bremen University)
Markets and movements. Freedom of movement in the common market and effects on sending countries: win-win or dependency?

Daniel Borbely, Ross Mckenzie (University of Dundee)
Forced migration and local economic development: evidence from postwar Hungary

Gretchen Abuso (Xavier University)
Colonial traces of emigration aspirations among Filipinos and its impact in contemporary Philippines

16:30-17:45

Panel 6: Emigration in art

Anne Pirwitz (University of Potsdam)
Screening post-emigration-spaces: the image of the abandoned homeland in new Romanian cinema

Jill Damatac (University of Cambridge)
Literatures of the left behind: missing mama and papa in the Philippines?

Amandine Desille (UMR-Passages, Université de Bordeaux; IGOT-ULisboa)
I am everywhere and nowhere at once (FILM: https://vimeo.com/610866045)

Marina Velez (Norwich University of the Arts and ICE, University of Cambridge)
Where we meet: mapping out the diaspora through photography

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