25 Oct 20105:30pm - 7:00pmCRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge

Description

This is a Cambridge Festival of Ideas event, open to all, free of charge. Questions and debate on the issues raised will be encouraged. If you would like to attend, please email Ankita Sahay to register.
 

Organisers

Chris Geissler (German and Dutch, Cambridge)
Dr Ildiko Csengei (English, Cambridge)

In 2008 the Advertising Standards Authority received over 500 complaints about a Barnardo’s ad featuring a girl being hit repeatedly in the head. The ASA declined to censure the organization, recognising that charity ads depicting children’s pain and suffering are vital in charities’ efforts to publicise their work and generate donations. Following the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, charity appeals overwhelmingly featured children — with substantial results. The Disasters Emergency Committee raised over £94 million by April 2010 in a campaign personified online by an injured Haitian child. Where do we draw the line between exposing a need and exploiting those who need? How does charity advertising make us feel sympathy, pity, solidarity or even guilt, and why does this work? How far is too far in depicting pain and suffering “for a good cause”, especially that of children?  What turns the public on to donating — and what turns them off?

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH IN THE ARTS, SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

Tel: +44 1223 766886
Email enquiries@crassh.cam.ac.uk