24 Sep 2007 - 25 Sep 2007All dayInstitute of Criminology - Faculty of Law - Sidgwick Site - Cambridge

Description

Conveners:
Loraine Gelsthorpe (Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge)
Katrin Müller-Johnson (Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge)

 

Evidence-led decision-making has become the leitmotif for criminal justice policy and practice in recent years. Yet traditional forms of evidence such as pre-sentence reports and expert testimony are often regarded as subjective and fallible. Eyewitness and earwitness testimony in the courtroom has been shown to be malleable. Late modern social transformations have resulted in bio-technical innovations in establishing evidence, which seem to hold the promise of more objective and reliable results, but it is unclear as to how far such evidence holds sway.

The aim of this two day interdisciplinary conference is to bring together a range of academics and legal and criminal justice practitioners to exchange ideas in relation to the validity and value of different kinds of evidence in the courtroom and to address some of the challenges in communicating evidence across interdisciplinary boundaries.
 

This is a small-scale conference designed to encourage debate between legal practitioners and academics. There is likely to be a high level of interest.

Sponsors
Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge
Pembroke College
Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH), University of Cambridge
 

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH IN THE ARTS, SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

Tel: +44 1223 766886
Email enquiries@crassh.cam.ac.uk