Science non-Fiction and the Bottom Billion [2015-2016]

From 2015 to 2016

CRASSH


About

Science non-Fiction and the Bottom Billion: Evolving Fairer Frameworks for the Future

Scientific and technological advances have had significant effects on the lives of the world’s poorest people. All too often, however, such people are excluded from the benefits and bear the brunt of negative externalities of technological change. If understanding of the political, social, economic and cultural implications of new technologies were to mature at a similar rate to that of the process of scientific innovation, might it be possible to change this? If those responsible for evolving and implementing political, regulatory and policy frameworks were to become more future-ready with regard to scientific and technological advances, could the interests of the bottom billion be better served?

Taking a case study approach this series asks:

  • What are the philosophical and ethical implications of scientific advances and technological inventions presently being developed in Cambridge?
  • What might be the social, economic, political and cultural consequences should these advances come into being, and for whom?
  • What legal and policy frameworks could be put in place to enhance positive, and mitigate against negative, impacts, particularly for poor and marginalised people?
  • What work could be going on in the arts, humanities and social sciences simultaneously with the work of scientists to ensure that future scientific and technological advances enhance, rather than undermine, the wellbeing of the world’s bottom billion?

 

Administrative assistance: gradfac@crassh.cam.ac.uk

Conveners

Conveners

Lara Allen (Humanitarian Centre)
Alan Blackwell (Computer Laboratory)
Robert Doubleday (Centre for Science and Policy)
Sharath Srinavasan (Centre of Governance and Human Rights, POLIS)
Bhaskar Vira (Department of Geography)

Programme 2015-16

 

Science non fiction
3D Printing and Humanitarian Aid
14 October 2015, Seminar Room SG2, Alison Richard Building

Tim Minshall (Cambridge), Laura James (Field Ready) -Science non Fiction

GM and Famine
28 October 2015, Seminar Room SG2, Alison Richard Building

Luke Braidwood (Cambridge) -Science non Fiction

Will Open Source Biotechnology Benefit the Bottom Billion?
11 November 2015, Seminar Room SG2, Alison Richard Building

Jenny Molloy (OpenPlant and Synthetic Biology Strategic Research Initiative), Lalitha Sundaram (Department of Pathology)-Science non Fiction

Drones and Conservation
25 November 2015, Seminar Room SG2, Alison Richard Building

Chris Sandbrook (Cambridge), Gavin Shelton (Fauna & Flora International) -Science non Fiction

“Who Owns Big Data? Will Machine Learning Systems Extract Cognitive Rents from the Poor?
25 January 2016, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building

Alan Blackwell (Cambridge), Richard Harper (Social Shaping Research) -Science non Fiction

Cataloging Global Diversity in the Human Genome: Promises and Pitfalls
08 February 2016, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building

Manj Sandhu (Sanger Institute)-Science non Fiction

Micro-Finance Innovation for Financial Inclusion in Developing Economies
22 February 2016, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building

Karl Prince (JBS, Cambridge)-Science non Fiction

Emerging Diseases: The Culture of Viruses
07 March 2016, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building

Derek Smith and Stephen John (Cambridge) -Science non Fiction

Technology for the Bottom Billion Workshop
10 June 2016, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building

Workshop -Science non Fiction

Assembling Entrepreneurs: Promises and Pitfalls of Innovation Hub Organizations in Africa
29 June 2016, Seminar room S2, 2nd Floor, Alison Richard Building

Nicolas Friederici (Oxford Internet Institute), Lara Allen (Centre for Global Equality)- Sciene non Fiction