Health, Medicine and Agency [2018-20]

Alternate Tuesdays 12.00-14.00 during term-time

Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT


About

In what ways do individuals influence the kinds of medical treatment options widely available? The ‘Health, medicine and agency’ research network posits that patient agency has been a central factor in shaping processes of medicalisation and biomedicalisation across a broad range of geographical and cultural contexts. In recent history, patient 'expertise' has been the driving force behind a wide range of social movements in the health sphere, from natural childbirth and euthanasia request to the rejection of compulsory vaccinations and unregulated use of antibiotics. The associated risks to health, fiercely polarized public opinion, and emergent subjectivities that have accompanied such social movements invite critical exploration. ‘Heath, medicine and agency’ brings into focus the growing importance of, and controversies surrounding, individual and patient agency by adopting an interdisciplinary perspective, thereby engaging work in the humanities, social and medical sciences.

Themes 2019-20

Michaelmas 2019: Limits of Patient Agency



Administrative assistance: Networks@crassh.cam.ac.uk

Convenors

Convenors

Dr Yuliya Hilevych (Newton International Fellow, Faculty of History)
Dr Sarah Hoare (The Healthcare Improvement Studies (THIS) Institute, University of Cambridge)
Dr Karolina Kuberska (The Healthcare Improvement Studies (THIS) Institute, University of Cambridge)
Dr Caroline Rusterholz  (Wellcome Trust Research Fellow, Faculty of History)

 

 

Yuliya Hilevych is a Newton International Fellow at the Faculty of History and an Affiliated scholar at the Reproductive Sociology Group (ReproSoc). She combines historical and sociological approaches to the study of reproduction, social relations, and demographic policy across time and space.


 

Dr Sarah Hoare is a Research Associate in The Healthcare Improvement Studies (THIS) Institute at the University of Cambridge. She is currently exploring patient and clinician experience of participating in an innovative screening programme aimed at detecting atrial fibrillation, a heart condition responsible for one in ten strokes. Sarah's work to date has focused on understanding the social context of healthcare, exploring how the interactions of patients, clinicians and organisations shape and are influenced by current practice, most recently in end-of-life care.

 

Dr Karolina Kuberska is a Research Associate at The Healthcare Improvement Studies (THIS) Institute at the University of Cambridge. The core of Karolina’s research interests and expertise falls within the scope of medical anthropology, with a specific focus on understandings of health, wellbeing, and healthcare. Recognising the value of qualitative studies that privilege individual people’s experiences, she is committed to interdisciplinary research that is able to impact lives in meaningful ways.


Previous convenors {2018-19]

Ms Hande Güzel (PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology)
Mr George Severs (PhD candidate Faculty of History) [2018-19]
Dr Natasha Kriznik (Research Associate, The Healthcare Improvement Studies Institute in the Department of Public Health and Primary Care) [2018-19]
Dr Elizabeth Turk  (Research Associate, Department of Social Anthroplogy) [2019-20]


 

Hande Güzel is a PhD candidate at the Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge. Her research interests cut across sociology of health and illness, gender, sexuality, and the body. Her PhD research focuses on re-virginisation practices in Turkey.

 

George Severs is a PhD student at Selwyn College, Cambridge, where he is researching a history of HIV/AIDS activism in the UK c. 1982-1997. Before this, he studied for an MPhil in Modern British History at Pembroke College, Cambridge with a thesis exploring the Church of England's responses to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. George also has a First Class (Honours) BA in History from Royal Holloway, University of London. His previous work examined the British National Party (BNP)'s opposition to gay men (c. 1982-1999) by employing a historically sociological analysis of the party's 'homohysteria' to more accurately identify the party's anti-gay attitudes.  Research interest: Post-war British history, Religious history, Queer history, LGBTQ history, Oral History, Radical history/histories of activism, British fascism.


 

Natasha is a Research Associate in The Healthcare Improvement Studies (THIS) Institute at the University of Cambridge. Her research interests relate to medical sociology, particularly health inequalities and public health, as well as the processes related to the production of social policy. She is also interested in social theory and its use in enhancing the outcomes of research.

 


Faculty Advisors

Professor Sarah Franklin (Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology)
Professor Nick Hopwood (Professor of History of Science and Medicine, Department of History and Philosophy of Science)
Professor Simon Szreter (Professor of History and Public Policy, Faculty of History)
Professor Graham Martin (Director of Research, The Healthcare Improvement Studies Institute, Department of Public Health and Primary Care)

Programme 2019-20

 

Health, Medicine and Agency
Reproduction and Law – The Limits of Patient Agency
08 October 2019, Seminar Room S1, 1st Floor, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT. NB Different room today
Visual Plague Photographic Database
22 October 2019, Seminar Room SG2, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT

Christos Lynteris (St Andrews)

What and Who Causes Health Inequalities?
08 November 2019, HPSS Library, Hardy Building (First floor, Room 108), Downing Site. Please note change of day and venue

Joint Reading Group with Geographies of Health

End-Of-Life-Care and Limits of Patient Agency
19 November 2019, Large Seminar Room, Cambridge Institute of Public Health, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Forvie Site, Cambridge, CB2 0SR

Erica Borgstrom (Open University), Natashe Lemos Dekker (Amsterdam)

Past Programmes

Programme 2018-19

In what ways do individuals influence the kinds of medical treatment options widely available? The “Health, medicine and agency” research network posits that patient agency has been a central factor in shaping processes of medicalisation and biomedicalisation across a broad range of geographical and cultural contexts. In recent history, patient 'expertise' has been the driving force behind a wide range of social movements in the health sphere, from natural childbirth and euthanasia request to the rejection of compulsory vaccinations and unregulated use of antibiotics. The associated risks to health, fiercely polarized public opinion, and emergent subjectivities that have accompanied such social movements invite critical exploration. “Heath, medicine and agency” brings into focus the growing importance of, and controversies surrounding, individual and patient agency by adopting an interdisciplinary perspective, thereby engaging work in the humanities, social and medical sciences, and creative arts.

Themes 2018-19
Michaelmas Term 2018: Patient Needs
Lent Term 2019: Patient Experience
Easter Term 2019: Collective Action and Engagement

Health, Medicine and Agency
Modern Times: The Way of All Flesh
08 October 2018, Seminar Room, SG2, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road. NB Change of room today

Film Screening- Health, Medicine and Agency 

Patient Needs: Conceptualisation
22 October 2018, Seminar Room, SG1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road

Reading session - Health, Medicine and Agency

Patient Needs: An Example from History
05 November 2018, Seminar Room, SG1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road

Dora Vargha (Exeter) Reading session - Health, Medicine and Agency

Patient Needs: Medical Technologies, (In)Equalities and New Imaginary Futures
19 November 2018, Seminar Room, SG1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road

Cathy Herbrand (De Montfort), Manuela Perrotta (Queen Mary London), Andrea Stockl (East Anglia), Elizabeth Toon (Manchester) - Health, Medicine and Agency

Patients as Consumer and the Personalisation of Medicine
21 January 2019, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road

Reading session - Health, Medicine and Agency

Reading group with Ilana Löwy
04 February 2019, Seminar Room S1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road NB S1, 1st floor today*

Ilana Löwy - Health, Medicine and Agency

Patients, Expertise and New Markets (Roundtable)
18 February 2019, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road

Tommy Dickinson (KCL), Marcin Smietana (Cambridge), Wendy Kline (Purdue College of Liberal Arts), Charlotte Faircloth (UCL) - Health, Medicine and Agency

Public Engagement Activities around Patients’ Experiences within Institutions (Roundtable)
04 March 2019, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road

Elizabeth Fistein (Public Health and Primary Care), Jenny Crane (Wellcome Trust), Janet Weston (LSHTM) - Health, Medicine and Agency

Patients, Health Experiences and Collective Action
13 May 2019, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT

Tracey Loughran (Essex), Kate Mahoney (Essex), Robert Pralat (Cambridge), Diana Rose (London)

Abortion Across Borders. Transnational Travel and Access to Abortion Services
29 May 2019, Diferent day and room. Seminar Room SG2, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT

Book launch. Christabelle Sethna (Ottawa)

Public Engagement in Health Research
10 June 2019, Seminar Room SG1, Alison Richard Building, 7 West Road, Cambridge, CB3 9DT

Joann Leeding (Cambridge), Anne Hanley (London)


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