Health and Welfare [2006-2011]

From 2006 to 2011

CRASSH


About

The Health and Welfare Group explores knowledge about health, disease and society from an interdisciplinary perspective. We approach this topic comparatively, focusing on the construction and conceptualisation of human and social well-being in diverse historical periods and geographical areas. In particular, the Group also considers the impact of these ideas on the contemporary practice of healthcare and the implementation of welfare policy. 

The Group meets fortnightly during term time with discussions focusing on one theme per term.  For 2010-11, these themes are Health Behaviours, Therapy Culture and Therapy Criticism and Intervention.  Events take on a variety of formats, including reading-group discussions, workshop seminars, round-table discussions between researchers and practitioners, invited speaker events and whole-day symposia. We are interested in exploring a wide variety of conceptual and methodological approaches to the study of health and welfare. We welcome faculty staff, students, clinicians/practitioners and anyone else keen to discuss these ideas in an academic environment.  

Conveners

Conveners

2010-11
Erica Borgstrom (Institute of Public Health)
Christopher Bunn (Institute of Metabolic)
Neil Singh (School of Clinical Medicine) 
Julie Walsh (History and Philosophy of Science)
Rebecca Whyte (History)

2009-10
Richard Barnett (History and Philosophy of Science)
Megan Clinch (General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit)
Rachel Hughes (Cambridge Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Group)
Neil Singh (School of Clinical Medicine) 
Julie Walsh (History and Philosophy of Science)
Rebecca Whyte (History)

2008-09
Richard Barnett  (HPS)
Simon Cohn       (General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit)
Bonnie Evans    (HPS)
Rachel Parry     (Learning Disabilities Research Group)
Sian Pooley       (History)
Nick Whitfield    (HPS)

2007-08
N/I

2006-07
N/I

Faculty Advisors 

John Forrester (History and Philosophy of Science)
Simon Szreter (History)

Themes

Themes  2010-2011 Health Behaviours, Therapy, & Intervention

 Today we can’t escape the fact that today many of our most severe health problems are caused, in part, by the wrong personal choices. Obesity, binge-drinking, smoking and drug addiction are putting millions of lives at risk and costing our health services billions a year. So getting to grips with them requires an altogether different approach to the one we’ve seen before. We need to promote more responsible behaviour and encourage people to make the right choices about what they eat, drink and do in their leisure time. (David Cameron, foreword, A Healthier Nation, Policy Green Paper No.12, Conservative Party 2010.)

If daily headlines and political speeches are anything to go by, behaviour is a major health concern of our times. But what is it? And why and how is medicine looking to the social sciences and humanities for models to explain and change them? The first term’s sessions aim to map and comment on the ways in which notions of behaviour have developed. 

In the following two terms, under the rubric of Therapy and Intervention, we will consider historical and contemporary investments in health interventions and behavioural therapies and explore their pragmatic and ideological coordinates.  We will engage with the literature of therapy criticism and ask, for example, whether political modes of citizenship have been recast as modes of ‘patient-hood’, or whether it makes sense to regard ‘therapy’ as an opiate of the masses? 

Michaelmas Term 2010: Health Behaviours
Lent Term 2011: Therapy Culture & Therapy Criticism
Easter Term 2011: Intervention

Theme 2009-10 Bodily Excess

Within the thematic framework of 'Bodily Excess', this term's sessions will explore some of the difficulties of conceptualising the health and welfare of the embodied self from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The 'body' in question not only pertains to both the individual and the social body, but also to the bodies of knowledge within which the problem of corporeal identities are discursively situated and assessed. With this in mind, we hope to think about the range and application of the term 'bodily excess' - to include profusion, violation, transgression, debauchery, compulsion, addiction, waste, surplus - in such a way that will attend to the dialectical relation between 'excess' and 'limit'.

Theme 2008-09 Dead Bodies and Transplanted Tissues

These sessions explore the relationship between two contentious and closely interleaved subjects: the shifting terrain of cultural and clinical attitudes towards death in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; and the issues raised by new cultures and technologies of human tissue transplantation and sale. Following the work of Philippe Aries, many scholars have criticised the apparent medicalisation of death in the modern West, in which death is constructed not as a physiological, social or metaphysical process but as a momentary event which can (and should) be defined and recorded for clinical, administrative and legal purposes. Similar questions about the definition of death as a social and clinical event have taken major roles in debates surrounding the transplantation and pro posed sale of human organs. Early clinical concerns about how to define the proper moment of death and window of organ removal have been complicated in recent debates about the permissibility of markets in human organs. The major question has become whether death terminates what anthropologist Don Joralemon has called the 'body-as-self' relation and permits an alternative perspective of the 'body-as-property': should dying be the signal for commodification? Drawing upon recent scholarship in philosophy and anthropology, this session explores the often-contentious confrontations between competing perspectives on organs, bodies and death.

LT 2009 Abnormal Behaviour, Medical Science and the Law

Theme Conveners:  Bonnie Evans and Simon Cohn

This term examines the way in which abnormal and 'anti-social' behaviour has been conceptualised using a biological model of causation. From an historical perspective, we will examine early constructions of abnormal and deviant behaviour and then explore their relation to current research in genetics and biology. Our aim is to investigate the legal and political implications of psychiatric, neurological and genetic research and treatment, and to examine how such developments have affected the provision of social welfare.

ET 2009 Care and Vulnerability

Term conveners:  Sian Pooley and Rachel Hughes

This term will explore care and vulnerability in a conceptual and comparative framework. How is care understood in political, philosophical, legal and historical discourses in different societies? How are concepts of vulnerability and ‘dependency’ constructed and experienced? The reading sessions will focus first on care as an important aspect of state welfare policies and international ethics, and second as an experience of individuals who receive and provide formal and informal care. 

Our first invited speaker, social worker and social policy academic Saul Becker, will examine these issues in the context of a study of the experiences of children who provide unpaid care to ill or disabled relatives (‘young carers’) in the UK.  Our second invited speaker, philosopher and ethicist Eva Kittay, will lead two separate sessions.  In the first, she will call into question the dichotomy that is set up between autonomy and paternalism in the context of care with reference to her concept of the ‘caring, transparent self’.  In the second, she will present a new argument on the subject of personhood and people with severe cognitive impairment.  

It is hoped that these seminars will encourage discussion of a wide range of issues, many of which are pertinent to current issues in health care and welfare policy: the boundary between formal and informal care; the relationship between vulnerability and dependency; surveillance of care and care as surveillance; and experiences of care and vulnerability across the life course. 

Past events

 

Health and Welfare Seminar
Gender Roles and Welfare Policy
30 January 2008, CRASSH
Official and Legal Identity Registration in Comparative Perspective: Historical fragements in a bare landscape
13 February 2008, CRASSH
Poverty, Entitlement and Welfare Policy
27 February 2008, CRASSH
The Quest for Individuality and Welfare in Weimar and Nazi Berlin
05 March 2008, CRASSH
Maintaining the 'healthy' body
07 May 2008, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
Abnormal to Supernormal: The Medical Construction of the Athletic Body in 20th Century Britain
21 May 2008, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
Pain, disease and disability
28 May 2008, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
'Classification', 'Identity' and 'The Body'
13 June 2008, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
The transplantation and sale of organs and tissues: bodies as self and bodies as property
15 October 2008, CRASSH Seminar Room, 17 Mill Lane
Will you save a stranger's life?
29 October 2008, CRASSH Seminar Room, 17 Mill Lane
Medicalised death: from social process to clinical moment (and back again?)
12 November 2008, CRASSH Seminar Room, 17 Mill Lane
From theft to donation: an exploration of the change in attitudes to the use of dead bodies for medical science
26 November 2008, CRASSH Seminar Room, 17 Mill Lane
Everyday life in a residence for people with intellectual impairments: A Conversation Analysis of interaction between residents and care staff
14 January 2009, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane (Seminar room)
Health and Welfare Research Group
21 January 2009, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
When the anorexia is talking: Dividing the illness from the patient
04 February 2009, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
Health and Welfare Research Group
18 February 2009, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
Do hormones in the womb affect how your brain develops?
04 March 2009, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane (Seminar room)
The politics and ethics of care
13 May 2009, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
Experiences of care and vulnerability
27 May 2009, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
A one-day symposium of Health and Welfare Research Group
18 June 2009, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
Health and Welfare Research Group
24 June 2009, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
Health and Welfare Research Group
14 October 2009, CRASSH 17 Mill Lane
Health and Welfare Research Group
28 October 2009, CRASSH 17 Mill Lane
Health and Welfare Research Group
11 November 2009, CRASSH 17 Mill Lane
Health and Welfare Research Group
25 November 2009, CRASSH 17 Mill Lane
Mirrors and Metamorphoses (Reading Group)
20 January 2010, CRASSH 17 Mill Lane
Epistemology, Ontology, What's that got to do with...Social Work, Medicine, Nursing?
21 January 2010, CRASSH 17 Mill Lane
Delivering Mental Health Services in the Developing World: Basic Needs and the Model for Mental Health and Development
03 February 2010, CRASSH 17 Mill Lane
Approaching Addiction (Reading Group)
17 February 2010, CRASSH 17 Mill Lane
Dr Darin Weinberg: 'The Social Reality of Addiction'
03 March 2010, CRASSH 17 Mill Lane
Revisiting Health Inequality
28 April 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Stories or Numbers? Constructing 'Evidence' in Health Policy and Practice
06 May 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Obesity and Welfare Regimes
12 May 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Biomedicine, the Market and Health Inequalities
26 May 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Diabetes peer Education among Turkish Migrants in Berlin: self-help for self-care
09 June 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Annual Symposium 2010
16 June 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Mapping Medicine’s Behaviour
13 July 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
This session also serves as background to Prof. Armstrong’s lecture in the next session.
Mapping Medicine’s Behaviour
13 October 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Reading Group. This session also serves as background to Prof. Armstrong’s lecture in the next session.
(Health) Behaviour: The very Possibility
27 October 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Professor David Armstrong (Kings College London)
Entangled Healths
10 November 2010, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Reading Group.
The Behaviour of Psychologists Designing Health Interventions: Stories from the Field
19 November 2010, The Mond Building, Seminar room, New Museums Site, Free School Lane
Dr Simon Cohn (University of Cambridge) Venue: The Mond Building
Educating Therapies? The School, the Clinic and Psychopathologisation
25 January 2011, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Dr Valerie Harwood (University of Wollongon, Australia)
Cognitive Enhancers: A Brave New World
02 February 2011, William Harvey Lecture Theatre at the Clinical School, Addenbrooke’s Campus
Prof Barbara Sahakian (Clinical Neuropsychology, Dept of Psychiatry, Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine) NB: Venue, William Harvey Lecture Theatre at the Clinical School
Anti-Psychiatry Revisited
09 February 2011, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Reading Group
The Bonds of the Therapeutic
23 February 2011, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Reading Group
Analysis Not Therapy: Speaking Out
11 March 2011, Seminar Room 1, Dept of History and Philosophy of Science, Free School Lane.
Rob Weatherill (Psychoanalytic psychotherapist and lecturer in psychoanalysis St. Vincent's University College Hospital, Trinity College and the Milltown Institute of Philosophy and Theology). Venue HPS
Nudging Health- Postponed 15 June
04 May 2011, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Reading group.
Deciding on intervention
18 May 2011, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Reading Group
Services, Care Packages and Empowered Users
01 June 2011, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Dr. Marcus Redley, (University of Cambridge)
Nudging Health
15 June 2011, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane
Reading Group
Annual Health and Welfare Symposium
28 June 2011, CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge
Keynote speaker: Dr Monica Greco (Goldsmiths University of London)