Ships In The Proletarian Night: Currents in British Marxism

26 March 2021, 16:00 - 17:30

ONLINE

Panel 6: Currents in British Marxism
  • Brendan Harvey: 'Christopher Caudwell’s Critique of Materialism'
  • Vicente Montenegro Bralic: 'Althusser, penseur de la différence. Stuart Hall et l’introduction d’Althusser dans les Cultural Studies'

On this panel, twentieth-century British Marxism is the focus. Bringing together both marginalised and canonical figures, the panel puts particular emphasis on the influence of French figures in the British Marxist tradition. Miri Davidson’s paper explores on the influence of French anthropologist Claude Meillassoux on the London-based Selma James and Mariarosa Dalla Costa in the late 1960s and early 1970s, examining how this exchange helped to shape the influential materialist feminist notion of social reproduction. Brendan Harvey recuperates the underread work of Christopher Caudwell, a Marxist cultural critic active in the 1930s whose critique of materialism retains theoretical and political value in the contemporary world. Finally, Vicente Montenegro Bralic reassesses Stuart Hall’s retooling of the British cultural studies project in the 1970s, tracing how Louis Althusser’s philosophy helped Hall articulate the relationship between class, race and colonialism in new ways.

If you would like to receive pre-circulated papers for this session please email: marxseminaradmin@riseup.net

About the Cambridge Reading Marx Seminar

Founded by Solange Manche, Louis Klee, and Joe Davidson in July 2019, the Cambridge Reading Marx Seminar is a multidisciplinary research forum based in King’s College and cooperates with the «Lectures de Marx» seminar at the École Normale Supérieure (Ulm) in Paris. The group runs a reading group style discussion circle and hosts invited speakers, creating a space for discussion of Marx’s work.
 

Organised by:

The Reading Marx Seminar at Cambridge
Séminaire «Lectures de Marx»  ENS (Ulm)
 

Supported by:

CRASSH 20th Anniversary Logo   Society for French History