Under the Hood of the Digital Collection

22 March 2017, 13:30 - 15:00

SG2, Alison Richard Building, Sidgwick Site

A workshop for the Machine Reading the Archive programme led by Pip Willcox (The Bodleian Libraries, Oxford) and convened by the Cambridge Digital Humanities Strategic Network.

Early English Books Online (EEBO) contains digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, British North America, and works in English printed elsewhere, between 1473 and 1700. It is a key resource for students of all aspects of the early modern period—history, language, literature, theology, philosophy, law, music, the history of science, medicine, mathematics, and more.

With the University of Michigan Library, the Bodleian Libraries at the University of Oxford led the Text Creation Partnership (TCP), a project that created digital editions of every unique title in English from EEBO. These texts are marked up in Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) compliant XML and used to power the full-text search via EEBO and other interfaces.

This 90 minute workshop will introduce both EEBO and its TCP texts, suggesting ways to make the most of this valuable resource.  You may find it useful to bring a laptop.

Please note limited spaces are available for this event and should be booked in advance: book here (Raven access required - if you are not a member of staff or a student at the University of Cambridge please contact digitalhumanities@crassh.cam.ac.uk to check if a space is available)

About the speaker:

Pip Willcox is the Head of the Centre for Digital Scholarship at the Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford, and a Senior Research at the Oxford e-Research Centre. She co-directs the Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School and convenes its introductory workshop strand. With a background in textual editing and book history, her current work investigates narrative and the intersection between the material and the digital, exploring the experimental humanities. Between 2006 and 2014 she worked as an editor on the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership project.