Four Maps and a Wedding: Ecuadorian Indigenous Peoples and Contested Notions of Landscape and Territory

30 January 2012, 17:15 - 19:00

CRASSH

Dr Sarah Radcliffe (Reader in Latin American Geography, University of Cambridge)
Respondent: Dr Michael Bravo (Senior Lecturer, Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge)

Over recent years in Ecuador, indigenous social movements have made considerable gains with regards to legal and constitutional rights in a number of spheres, including education, health policy, and their rights to participation, and to cultural recognition. Nevertheless, their claims to land and territory remain tenuous and highly contested. This paper explores the aesthetic, political and cultural basis of indigenous claims to land and their re-working of the imaginative geographies of Ecuadorian nation-space. The paper explores the actions of national indigenous confederations and their regional affiliates in ceremonial performances of attachment to land, and cartography. The paper reports on research carried out on these themes over the past five years.

 

Dr Sarah  Radcliffe is a Reader in Latin American Geography. Her research interests include development and postcolonial governance, ethnodevelopment policy formation in Andean countries, gender, place and difference, and geographies of national identities.

Dr Michael  Bravo is a Senior Lecturer in Geography and convenor of the Circumpolar History and Public Policy Research Group at the Scott Polar Research Institute. He researches Arctic governance and maritime geographies.


 

Open to all. No registration required

Part of the Taking Place seminar series.
F
or more information about the group, please visit the link on the right hand side of this page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open to all. No registration required

Part of the Taking Place seminar series.
F
or more information about the group, please visit the link on the right hand side of this page.