Learning from the Islamic Educational Past for the Western Academic Future

2 June 2010, 12:45 - 14:00

CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge

Dr Elke Stockreiter (Department of History, University of Iowa, US)

Islamic institutions of learning were historical hubs of cultural diversity and manifestations of translocality. By the 12th-century, Islamic universities, such as in Timbuktu, Mali, attracted students from the remotest corners of Africa and beyond, providing interdisciplinary education that accommodated religious knowledge with practical experience. Can historic examples of Islamic transmission of knowledge serve as guidance for reshaping 20th-century Western universities, particularly in a post-9/11 climate? Drawing on case studies from Africa and the Middle East, I will investigate how historical examples of two intrinsic aspects of Islamic education, cultural diversity and translocality, could inform future models of higher education in increasingly globalised and multi-cultural societies.  

 

Work-in-Progress Seminars 
The work-in-progress seminars feature the work of our termly Visiting Fellows and Early Career Fellows.

Seminars begin at 12.45 and end at 2pm. Presentations are no more than 25 minutes long to allow plenty of time for discussion. Tea, coffee and sandwiches are provided. All welcome. The seminar is open to all - no need to register.

Readings for the Work in Progress sessions are available by clicking on the  link on the right.  People attending from outside the Centre can request access to the readings by contacting Michelle Maciejewska  for information.