Professor David Clarke (Newcastle University)

9 May 2011, 12:45 - 02:00

CRASSH, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge.

Part of the CRASSH Fellows Work-in-Progress seminar series.  All welcome, no registration necessary.  Sandwich lunch and refreshments provided.

   Professor David Clarke (University of Newcastle- 
   upon-Tyne
)
   CRASSH Visiting Fellow Easter 2011
   The Experience of Cultural Difference: Learning Hindustani
   Classical Music in a Western University

  
Email: d.i.clarke@ncl.ac.uk

Informing my proposal is TW Adorno's imagining of peace among human beings: 'Peace is the state of distinctness without domination, with the distinct participating in each other'. In contrast to the corporatist cliches of current university mission statements, this suggests a more worthy vision for the future university, which it might pursue through theoretical reflection and intervention, and the practical cultivation of curricula that not only reflect distinctness, or cultural difference, but foster participatory engagement with it.

I will ask a range of questions including what can music, as a social practice, contribute to interdisciplinary debates on plurality and inclusivity, identity and difference? How might ethnomusicology and practical engagement with world musics help develop models of ‘distinctness without domination’? What insights might be gained from the philosophies and consciousnesses (howsoever defined) underpinning other musics?

I will also examine my own experience of learning Indian music and of implanting it into the curriculum.

About David Clarke

David Clarke, Professor of Music, joined the Music Department at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1991, having previously lectured at Dartington College of Arts and the University of Liverpool. His interests include the composer Michael Tippett, on whom he has published various books and articles, as well as musical aesthetics, theory and analysis, and North Indian (Hindustani) classical music. As conductor, violinist and Hindustani classical vocalist in the Khyal tradition, he also remains active as a musical practitioner. He is a graduate of Royal Holloway College (University of London), read for his PhD under Jim Samson at Exeter University, and also studied as an exchange student at the University of Massachusetts and the Free University, Berlin.

 

To access the Readings for the Work in Progress seminar, please contact Michelle Maciejewska.